Top 5 moments when Sutton Foster dazzled us

If anyone knows how to entertain an audience, it’s Sutton Foster. This two-time Tony Award winner can do it all: sing, dance, act, and make people laugh. And her show at the Deer Valley® Music Festival is not something you’ll want to miss.

Don’t believe us? Here are some of the best moments when her powerhouse performances stole the show.

Foster’s first big break was in Thoroughly Modern Milly, a story about a small-town girl who escapes to New York City. While she was originally the understudy for this role, she ended up playing it on Broadway and getting her first Tony for it.

Maybe she doesn’t want to show off, but after a performance like this, we don’t mind if she steals the spotlight at her Deer Valley performance! Foster was nominated for the Tony for Best Actress in a Musical for this hilarious performance of The Drowsy Chaperone.

Is there anything this woman can’t do? This clip of her award-winning performance in Anything Goes showcases her amazing singing AND dancing skills.

If you’re not familiar with her work on Broadway, you will definitely know her from TV. She’s currently on her fifth season of Younger on TV Land. Apparently, she’s hilarious on- and off-screen because she’s always finding ways to make her co-stars laugh.

If you spent the holidays in Salt Lake City last year, you may have already seen Sutton Foster perform live. She gave a stunning performance at the Mormon Tabernacle Choir’s yearly Christmas program.

This concert will be nothing short of amazing. Get your tickets to see Sutton Foster with the Utah Symphony here.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someone

Q&A with Rick Springfield

We may be an orchestra, but you better believe we know how to rock n’ roll. This summer, we’re most excited to rock out with Rick Springfield himself! We asked him a few questions, and he gave us some thoughtful answers.

How is writing song lyrics similar to writing a novel?

It’s a very similar process. I sit with my computer open and wait for a miracle. Most of the time there is zip, but occasionally the process produces something. Writing a novel is like writing a really, really long song that doesn’t have to rhyme. It’s all a crap-shoot and I never know what the outcome will be with either, so it keeps it interesting. The great thing about writing is that anything can happen—which is the magic in it.

What are your biggest musical inspirations?

The Beatles—I’m still trying to figure out what they did. Early Cliff Richard and The Shadows. And before that, Rodgers and Hammerstein and all the great Broadway musicals.

What are you most excited about for your debut in Park City?

Going back to where I learned to ski. In 1979, I had a friend who was a really good skier, so we went to Park City, and I fell down the mountain for a few days until I finally got the hang of it. I will always have great memories of this place because it was just before the “Jessie’s girl” hit and everything changed for me.

How has music and artistic expression helped you through your experiences with depression?

Music and having a voice in the arts has been a great help. Art is as nebulous as depression, so they go hand in hand to me. A lot of what I write comes from my depression, and I try to turn it into something positive so it doesn’t beat me. I would always recommend talking to someone and not have it be a lonely journey. Artistic expression is something that can channel darkness very well.

Are you working on any projects that you’re passionate about right now?

I am writing a new novel, finishing up an orchestral album, and writing new music. Touring with the 3 different shows (my band, solo, and symphony) is very exciting and keeps things interesting.

What are some of your best memories of being on the road?

The road is tough. The most fun are the gigs. That’s what keeps me on the road. The big party at the end of a long journey.

Get your fix of rock n’ roll at Rick Springfield with the Utah Symphony! Buy your tickets here.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someone

Q&A with Jerry Steichen

What is your best memory of the Deer Valley Music Festival? 

  1. Watching the slope fill up with audience members—spreading blankets, sharing friendship.
  2. The first moment I walk out on stage and feel the excitement before each concert.
  3. The first four seasons, when we did fully-staged and choreographed Gilbert and Sullivan operettas.
  4. And the sound of the Utah Symphony echoing through the valley.

What are things you always do when you come to Utah? 

  1. Crown Burger!
  2. Hiking around Deer Valley.
  3. Coffee with Llew and Sally Humphreys.

In your opinion, what makes Stephen Sondheim and Andrew Lloyd Webber great composers?

Lloyd Webber has an incredible gift for melody, and he composes easily in every musical style. Compare Jesus Christ Superstar to Cats to Phantom of the Opera—talk about flexibility. But it’s really his melodies that grab you.

Sondheim has the broadest gifts of theatrical skill. From the lyrics to West Side Story and Gypsy to the complex characters in Into the Woods and Company to the musical genius that is Sweeney Todd and Sunday in the Park with George—his mastery of text combining with music to take us on musical journeys is unsurpassed

What is the best thing about conducting at the Deer Valley Music Festival?

The orchestra and the audience—there is so much Joy.

What do you like most about this concert’s repertoire?

Variety! My favorite thing is having something different in every selection, and it is so much fun!

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someone